Updates

May the territory expand



Rider, Attic red-figured cup — Middle of 5th century BC

Updates

On the following page you will find updates regarding the website and its content. The update appear in chronological order, with the latest update at the very top and earlier ones below it.

I highly encourage you to check back here every so often so as to not miss out on new website features or content.

June 19, 2021

I have, unforunately, been somewhat lazy regarding the updating of my website, the reasons for which are plentiful. Firstly, as summer has finally made its appearance here and brought its scorching heat and humidity with it, I have become somewhat prone to laziness, as the constant bombardment with UV, IR and other types of radiation from the nuclear reactor millions of kilometres away from Earth creates oft-horrid climatic conditions not only outside but even inside. I appear to be prone to some cardiovascular issues whenever the temperatures reach a certain point and stay there for a prolonged period of time, so that headaches and diziness are not an uncommon occurrence — concentrating on more demanding subjects can, therefore, be additionally taxing.

Beside these issues, work has been rather busy as of late as well; and due to the fact that we are, once again, required to attend school in person, I have much less free-time now than I did back in mid-May. Once the summer holidays begin — which they will at the beginning of next month —, I will, unfortunately, have even less free-time, as it implies my having to go to work during the day on which I would usually attend school; and as school days are shorter than work days, my free-time will dimish as well.

Nevertheless, I have taken two weeks off work starting at the end of June, during which time I hope to focus my attention towards the improvement of my Greek and this website; whether or not I shall succeed with that endeavour is, however, still unknown — the weather plays a not insignificant role in my success (or failure). Additionally, as my body appears to slowly — but surely — acclimate to the new weather conditions, my apathy has somewhat vanquished as a result and I, therefore, hope to start my work on the Presbyterium some time soon.

I have slowly begun accumulating old books, amongst them being a rather old New Testament from the early 1700s and two other New Testaments from the 19th century. And whilst all three are interesting in their own right, the 18th-century book is, undoubtedly, the most interesting of the bunch; I have already finished thoroughly documenting it in pictures and shall soon begin writing the article about it. I dearly hope that it will arouse the interest of some — as it did mine. Due to the large amount of photos I took — the majority of which I would like to showcase in the article — I have begun working on a small CSS-based image gallery that I can place at the end (or beginning) of the webpage; positioning all the images I took at the left or right side of the page would not work with such a large number of photos.

In addition to what I have already mentioned, my editing environment has been moved from Atom over to VSCode; I also have my eyes set upon a different editor, one which, I find, shows great potential — VSCode with a Vim and SFTP plugin has, however, been more than adequate and is much speedier than Atom.

Regarding my translation of the Revelation, I simply wish to state that it has been somewhat postponed until I am sufficiently acclimated to the weather for me to properly use my brain again. However, I have been using my lunch break — which my boss has made mandatory now — to re-read the Revelation, so that I might have an easier time translating it once I, again, begin my work.

I am sorry that not much has happened for a month, but rest assured that I will return with my usual update schedule shortly.

May 25, 2021

I have managed to translate two more chapters of the Revelation, namely three and four, and I’m currently working on finishing the fifth. Working on the translation has been much more interesting now that I am past the portion of the text consiting merely of the various letters to the seven churches of Asia.

Other than that, I have continued my reading of the Septuaginta. As I have grown somewhat bored of Gconditions not only outside but even inside. I appear to be prone to some cardiovascular issues whenever the temperatures reach a certain point and stay there for a prolonged period of time, so that headaches and diziness are not an uncommon occurrence — concentrating on more demanding subjects can, therefore, be additionally taxing.

Beside these issues, work has been rather busy as of late as well; and due to the fact that we are, once again, required to attend school in person, I have much less free-time now than I did back in mid-May. Once the summer holidays begin — which they will at the beginning of next month —, I will, unfortunately, have even less free-time, as it implies my having to go to work during the day on which I would usually attend school; and as school days are shorter than work days, my free-time will dimish as well.

Nevertheless, I have taken two weeks off work starting at the end of June, during which time I hope to focus my attention towards the improvement of my Greek and this website; whether or not I shall succeed with that endeavour is, however, still unknown — the weather plays a not insignificant role in my success (or failure). Additionally, as my body appears to slowly — but surely — acclimate to the new weather conditions, my apathy has somewhat vanquished as a result and I, therefore, hope to start my work on the Presbyterium some time soon.

I have slowly begun accumulating old books, amongst them being a rather old New Testament from the early 1700s and two other New Testaments from the 19th century. And whilst all three are interesting in their own right, the 18th-century book is, undoubtedly, the most interesting of the bunch; I have already finished thoroughly documenting it in pictures and shall soon begin writing the article about it. I dearly hope that it will arouse the interest of some — as it did mine. Due to the large amount of photos I took — the majority of which I would like to showcase in the article — I have begun working on a small CSS-based image gallery that I can place at the end (or beginning) of the webpage; positioning all the images I took at the left or right side of the page would not work with such a large number of photos. enesis, I decided to skip ahead to Exodus and have read roughly twenty pages of that already; it is definitely a much more interesting read than the later chapters of Genesis. Additionally, I have been wondering whether I should start reading the Psalms or some of the prophets — such as Ezekiel — in addition to Exodus; the decision has yet to be reached.

Last — but most definitely not least — is the Presbyterium. The name is the Latinised version of the Greek word πρεσβυτέριον which translates to Council of Elders; and, indeed, I have chosen its name due to the fact that this page will contain information about old books. I have recently begun collection various old books regarding the language and also written in the language and have decided to create a page with information about them. Once the books arrive — for I have ordered them online — I will be taking photos, gathering as much information as I can about them and publish it in the Presbyterium.

May 23, 2021

I have now finally finished adding every single chapter of the Revelation of John onto my page and have even finished translating the second one; only twenty-two to go! Unfortunately, the first three chapters are rather drab — they simply consist of letters sent to various churches in Asior Minor — and translating them is not too much fun; it should get much more interesting from chapter four onwards.

In addition to that, I did some work on my website’s CSS, as I have always been somewhat annoyed at the fact that the images displayed within the articles themselves did not have a space underneath them on mobile. It was, therefore, sometimes a tad confusing and you might think that the image caption was, in fact, part of the text. I have now added a padding of 15px underneath, more than enough to mitigate the problem.

I have also added some more links to my Links page and more information onto my About page. The latter is mainly due to the fact that I have finally created a GitHub repository for my website, where anyone might download a copy of my website for offline usage.

May 22, 2021

Pentecost is waiting at the doorstep and I decided to take a day off and, thus, have a long weekend. I have already been doing a bit of work on my website, mainly adding the Links page and the Updates page you are currently on; and, additionally, I have finally begun my translation of the Revelation. I have successfully translated the first chapter of it and have begun adding the other chapters already. I am hoping to have added all the chapters (i. e. the original Greek, a transliteration and an image) by the end of the day or by tomorrow morning; thereafter, I can easily translate a chapter as I have the time to and am simply required to add the English text onto the page.

I am also thinking of updating this website’s design somewhat, though I am still uncertain whether that which I have in mind is a good idea; I am still running my ideas by a handful of my friends to see what their opinions on them might be. One thing that I have already done, however, is the addition of a Next and Previous button onto each page of my translations; this should make navigation much less cumbersome and improve the reading experience immensly.

In addition to that, I have begun my attempt at reading Homer — and it went as I had expected; though, I must admit, it was not quite as difficult as I had imagined. Indeed, I did not read a whole lot, but careful reading allowed me to understand what the sentences I was reading meant. Nevertheless, I still have much practice ahead of me if I wish to attain fluency in Homer.

Another text I have begun trying to read is the Enchiridion. I would be most happy if I would be able to find a nice reader’s edition of his work, but I have yet to stumble across one. Nevertheless, the grammar and vocabulary are, for the most part, rather simple and reading the next with the help of a dictionary has been somewhat rewarding. I am thinking of writing a translation of this book as well, though I most likely will not begin my work for quite a long while.

I have also been working on SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) with tips I received by the helpful owner of Koshka’s Kingdom and have been seeing some tiny impact already. Indeed, as I am using Cloudflare as my DNS, I am able to see how many unique vistors my site gets in a day — and that number has, since the site’s creation, been steadily growing. I am hoping that by the addition of meta tags and titles, I will be able to increase that number further.


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